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Wednesday, November 16
 

3:00pm EET

[SLIDES]Jezen Thomas @jezenthomas - Haskell On Rails
For years, Ruby on Rails has been the web application framework of choice for software developers who need to *Get Things Done*. We can rapidly prototype, and then effortlessly ship. But what happens when the complexity of the system inevitably grows? We write tests, and more tests, and even more tests, and still we're on our knees, fighting fires and debugging. We need better tools. We need our machines to automatically verify the fundamental correctness of our systems. These tools have been around for a while, but until recently the “Getting Started” material has been thin on the ground. In this talk I will show you how to get up and running and ready to build stuff with a Rails-like framework underpinned by one of the fastest and most stable languages in the industry: Haskell. The talk will cover everything from setting up a development environment, to integrating with a database and deploying to a VPS. Although this is a Haskell talk, it's from an angle of pragmatism and not academia. You do not need to know Haskell to enjoy this talk.

Speakers
avatar for Jezen Thomas

Jezen Thomas

WEB APPLICATION DEVELOPER, Syft
Jezen Thomas is a software developer, writer, and public speaker spending most of his time building things for the Internet with Ruby, JavaScript, and Haskell. He currently works remotely from the North coast of Poland, leading user interface development at Syft, a hospitality recruitment... Read More →


Wednesday November 16, 2016 3:00pm - 3:55pm EET
5. Theta
 
Friday, November 18
 

11:20am EET

[SLIDES]Dylan Beattie @dylanbeattie - Webmasters, Full Stack Developers and Other Legends
Once upon a time, when the web was young, phones were dumb and people still thought progressive JPEGs were a pretty neat idea, there were people who called themselves... THE WEBMASTERS. They were brave, they were bold. Armed with a 56k modem and a stack of O'Reilly books, the webmasters were fearless in their ongoing quest, driven by a humble vision - to connect the entire world together. Using Netscape Navigator. Of course, that was a long time ago, and nobody really believes the stories any more. Some say the webmasters are gone. Some say they never existed in the first place - it was just a bunch of marketing people with delusions of grandeur. But a few, a select few, believe they changed. They evolved. They learned new skills, they embraced new technology... and the Legend of the Full Stack Developer was born. The history of software development is rich with tales of extraordinary individuals, whose knowledge of their own systems was absolutely unrivalled. But here in 2016, in a world where distributed systems, machine learning and autoscaling cloud systems are ubiquitous and the average web app uses three JavaScript frameworks, four server-side languages and six different kinds of caching technology, does it really make any sense to talk about full stack developers? Are we clinging to outdated paradigms, nostalgic for the simple days when one person really could know all the answers - or does overspecialisation represent a genuine threat to the established discipline of software development? And if it does - should we be resisting it, or embracing it as a change that's long overdue?

Speakers
avatar for DYLAN BEATTIE

DYLAN BEATTIE

System Architect, Skills Matter
Dylan Beattie is a systems architect and software developer, who has built everything from tiny standalone websites to large-scale distributed systems. He's currently the CTO at Skills Matter in London, where he juggles his time between working on their software platform, supporting... Read More →


Friday November 18, 2016 11:20am - 12:15pm EET
2. Beta

3:45pm EET

[SLIDES]Boyan Mihaylov @bmihaylov - Stop the Internet, I want to go offline
Traditionally we consider web sites to be working in an online mode only. If the Internet connection drops, the entire web site stops functioning. Mobile applications, however, change this perception as connection is considered unstable and applications should take necessary measures for good user experience. Now we are able to create web sites that react on changes in the Internet connection and provide certain functionality offline. AppCache, IndexedDB and File API are few of the mechanisms to allow us to store the application and its data in the browser. However, now we have some questions to think about: Who is the master of the data - the client or the server? What data should we download in advance? How do we handle updates of the application? In this talk I will give overview of how web applications can go offline and which precautions we should take.

Speakers
avatar for Boyan Mihaylov

Boyan Mihaylov

SOFTWARE ARCHITECT, WEB ENTHUSIAST, IMPROVISER, Unipension
Boyan is a software architect and developer, thinking both business and tech. Originally from Bulgaria, he works at a pension fund in the lovely Copenhagen, where with a team of highly motivated people they aim to transform the organization from being purely operational into becoming... Read More →


Friday November 18, 2016 3:45pm - 4:40pm EET
5. Theta
 

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